Afternoon Tea at the Venice Biennale

I was lucky enough to be Selected to be part of the Exhibition Afternoon Tea, which is part of the Venice Biennale.  The exhibition was organised by the WW Gallery, which is  curated by Debra Wilson and Chiara Williams.

If you are going to be in Venice do pop along, its open from 30 May – 12 June, 3-6pm daily by appointment only.

The Quaffers Pavilion
Campo San Polo
S. Polo 1960, 30125 Venice, Italy
Vaporetto: S. Silvestro

Contacts: 
wwgallery@gmail.com
+447531342128 (London)
+393317404189 (Venice)
+44 (0)7531342128
www.wilsonwilliamsgallery.com

There is nothing more exhilarating than the buzz and atmosphere of the opening week of the Venice Biennale. As the longest-running, most prestigious international art biennial in the world, the Venice Biennale of Art is the biggest event in the art calendar.

WW Gallery is excited to present its collateral exhibition ‘Afternoon Tea’ from 30 May – 12 June at The Quaffers Pavilion as part of the ‘UK at the Venice Biennale’ programme.
The Quaffers Pavilion will act as an outpost of The British Pavilion, originally designed in 1887 as a tearoom. ‘Afternoon Tea’ is an antidote to the vastness of the Biennale proper, a chance to put your feet up and have art served to you. As Venetians rouse from their siestas, and while restaurants and cafes are closed until the evening shift, WW Gallery invites visitors to unwind and partake in the great British tradition of afternoon tea. From 3 – 6pm daily, free tea and cake will be served along with a selection of contemporary works on paper.

The phrase ‘works on paper’, like ‘afternoon tea’, evokes a curious, slightly old school nostalgia. But even in this new media age, working on paper is relevant and still underpins the practice of most contemporary artists. The immediacy of marks on paper lends itself to the honest and direct outpouring of dreams, memories, fantasies and humour, offering an intimate exchange between artist and viewer. The works in this exhibition are free from a common theme and instead simply reflect the current spectrum
of small-scale works on paper, where image and text are expressed in their most vivid and vital form.

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